Adobe Flash 10: Native 64-bit Linux Plugin

I just wanted to mention that Adobe has released a native 64-bit version of their Flash plugin for web browsers today. I installed it for Firefox by going to this page, and clicking the “Download 64-bit Plugin for Linux” link. Before doing anything uninstall all flash plugins that you have on your system! For me, this was achieved by removing the nspluginwrapper and flashplugin-nonfree packages. Just extract the file you downloaded from the Adobe page; you will get a file called libflashplayer.so. Create a new directory called “plugins” in ~/.mozilla. Then, copy the libflashplayer.so file into ~/.mozilla/plugins, and restart Firefox. Done!

Even though it’s an alpha release, it seems to be working fine for sites like Youtube and CNN video, on my Xubuntu 64-bit system.

Aurora GTK Engine 1.4 Fix for Thunar

I have discovered a one-liner fix to the Aurora GTK Engine, for the bug where the menu opens and then immediately disappears when right-clicking on a file in Thunar (Xubuntu).

Open up ~/.themes/Aurora/gtk-2.0/gtkrc, and change the GtkMenu::vertical-padding = 0 to GtkMenu::vertical-padding = 1. Now if you right-click on a file or folder in Thunar, the pop-up menu works properly.

UPDATE November 11, 2008: Thanks to this guy, I can now happily use Aurora-midnight with Firefox — and input text box areas for sites like Google and the new Hotmail work much, much better (especially Hotmail, where I had black text on black backgrounds for new emails!). Here is my userContent.css file located in ~/.mozilla/firefox/…default/chrome:

input {
border: 1px inset black;
background-color: white;
color: black;
-moz-appearance: none !important;
}

textarea {
border: 1px inset black;
background-color: white;
color: black;
-moz-appearance: none !important;
}

select {
border: 1px inset black;
background-color: white;
color: black;
-moz-appearance: none !important;
}

input[type="radio"],
input[type="checkbox"] {
border: 1px inset black ! important;
background-color: white ! important;
color: ThreeDFace ! important;
-moz-appearance: none !important;
}

*|*::-moz-radio {
background-color: white;
-moz-appearance: none !important;
}

button,
input[type="reset"],
input[type="button"],
input[type="submit"] {
border: 1px outset black;
background-color: #eeeeee;
color: black;
-moz-appearance: none !important;
}

body {
background-color: white;
color: black;
display: block;
margin: 8px;
-moz-appearance: none !important;
}

As an added bonus, the buttons and input boxes in Google, GMail, etc. integrate very nicely with the Whitehart theme for Firefox.

Xfce4-Terminal + Console Vim Glitch Workaround

I’ll try to keep this short. I’m using Xubuntu 8.04.1 + vim 7.1.138. (Xfce4-terminal is version 0.2.8).

The problem: If you have the lines and columns options set in your .vimrc file for gvim‘s default window size upon startup, you run into a strange graphics glitch if you attempt to run simple console vim inside xfce4-terminal. What you type does not get displayed, and a new line appears after every keystroke, deleting the previous line — although the data of what you typed in is still there. It is the same problem discussed here. I encountered this problem while executing the git commit -an command from xfce4-terminal, when git resorted to vim as the default text editor. (NOTE: You might need to edit xfce4-terminal’s default window size in ~/.config/Terminal/termnalrc (the MiscDefaultGeometry option) to reproduce the glitch — I had mine set to 80×19).

The solution: Make the lines and columns options in .vimrc dependent on the “gui_running” variable, like so (copied from here):

if has("gui_running")
"GUI is running or is about to start.
"Maximize gvim window.
set lines=69 columns=100
" if we're in console Vim, then we just want to leave the window size alone --
" let it simply be whatever the window size of the terminal is before vim is
" launched
"else
"  "This is console Vim.
"  if exists("+lines")
"    set lines=69
"  endif
"  if exists("+columns")
"    set columns=100
"  endif
endif

This works. You do not get the strange graphical glitch behavior described above, by making vim only resize the window if it is gvim, and not console vim. I have commented out the console vim settings because, as stated above, I already have a default window size of 80×19 for xfce4-terminal.

Note: If you use xterm, it doesn’t matter — even if you don’t have the special “gui_running” option in your .vimrc, console vim will work properly. So run git commands in xterm if you don’t like xfce4-terminal.